Their Secret Life | The Present Prevention Challenge

Their Secret Life | The Present Prevention Challenge

Their Secret Life | The Present Prevention Challenge
By: Janna Payne Sells

“It’s my job to be in your business, I am your mother.”

Those were my mother’s exact words after she found a notebook full of handwritten letters (pre-digital footprint) that I haphazardly threw into our family’s wood burning fireplace.  Fire is a funny thing.  It can completely destroy evidence or leave it untouched; it all depends on the flame and oxygen flow.  As you’ve already figured out that fire I tried to use to destroy evidence of my unhealthy adolescent behavior didn’t work.  My mother was standing in front of me with all my secrets in her hand.  My heart was racing.  My words were fierce.  My mind was blurred with questions- Had she read it?  How fast can I grab it and run?  Has she no boundaries?  She has totally invaded my privacy.  I’m going to be grounded forever.  Please don’t tell Daddy.

That was my junior year of high school.. I think..Possibly younger.  

I was the oldest daughter of two married, college educated, Christian, hard-working, middle-class parents.  For me it was a phase.  For three of my classmates it was a death sentence.  For some of my family it is a daily battle.  For two of my friends it changed their lives forever.  

Alcohol and drug addiction do not discriminate.  Your children are not immune and if you think they’ve never tested, you’re dangerously ignorant.

My career started in an elementary classroom, progressed into a building leadership position, and that grew me into a district leadership position.  That district position changed my life forever.  It immersed me into a space in education I had previously never understood. This experience rerooted my compelling why.  My official role was, MTSS (Multi-Tiered System of Support) Coordinator.  That’s a fancy acronym that basically means I help coach support systems for students who have academic, behavior, and social emotional needs.

I cannot count the children (5th-12th grade) and parents that I talked to about alcohol and drug use.  Then it seemed to be part of the job.  It wasn’t until this year that I realized for many of these kids this is NOT a phase.  These kids are NOT okay.  We have to make changes!  How do we do that?

I began drafting the following personal convictions and questions around drug and alcohol use in young adolescents and teens based off my personal experience: 

  1. These children do not own their privacy. Why are we not in their business?
  2. Your socio-economic status, race, or religious or athletic affiliation does not protect your child.  Why are we ignoring the most at-risk?
  3. Children today have access to much more deadly toxicity levels.  How did we get here?
  4. DARE doesn’t work.  How do we really work on prevention?

I am here to challenge you in a #presentprevention movement.  Whether you are a parent, teacher, or mentor, it is OUR JOB TO BE IN THEIR BUSINESS.  We could spend hours discussing brain development and the physical need for adult guidance in young adolescents and teens, but we’ll leave it with– they don’t have the capacity to make good decisions.  Be present. Don’t discriminate.  Don’t be the adult that has to say, “If only I could turn back time and not miss the warning signs.”  Don’t pretend your kid is immune.  Take an active role. Your business is their business.

Did you know?

“Kids with at least 5 positive adult relationships outside their parents are 90% less likely to end up with a juvenile delinquency record.”

William Lassiter, NC Department of Public Safety

I wish I could promise that your presence will prevent dangerous behavior with absolute certainty, but I can’t.  Unfortunately, even with the most present parents, some of our children slip through.  What I can promise is that your presence will drastically reduce the odds.

Accept the #presentprevention challenge by becoming knowledgeable of the signs that are hidden in plain sight.  Complete the following checklist.

  1. Thoroughly perform routine bedroom checks.  
  2. Talk eye to eye with your child and their friends.
  3. Collect their phones or devices at night.
  4. Monitor their online and digital activity.
  5. Stay abreast of the trends.

Remember, their business is your job.  Do you suspect your child is abusing drugs or alcohol?   It is important to trust your gut, closely monitor your child’s behavior and understand that privacy does not become the priority over ensuring their safety.

Here are some tips and resources that may help you through the challenge.

Tips for bedroom checks:

  • Don’t overlook the obvious- paraphernalia, pro-drug use swag, bottles, caps, posters, etc.
  • Drawers.  Inside is a good start, but don’t forget to check the bottoms and backs.
  • Vents.  Pull them out and clean them out.
  • Bottle & fake cans.  Smell and Taste.  Don’t forget to check the bottoms.  Did you know kids can order water bottles that hide drugs online?  Here is an example from etsy.
  • Shoes.  Not just the toes, but under the soles.
  • Closets.  Clothes, totes, the back corners and back of shelves.
  • The bed.  Between mattresses.  Inside pillows.  The boxspring.  Headboards and footboards.
  • Behind mirrors and posters.
  • Inside lamps.
  • Small boxes and cases.  Examples: jewelry boxes, pencil boxes, make-up, cd & dvd cases etc.
  • Inside or between books.  Flip through the pages.
  • Inside ceiling panels
  • Inside computers or speaker system
  • On the top of bookshelves, vanities, or high shelves
  • The gap between the bottom drawer and the floor

Tips for phone checks:

  • Check accounts that delete communication and evidence: ie) snapchat
  • Look for hidden apps like the following: (More information)
    • AppLock
    • Vault
    • Vaulty
    • SpyCalc
    • Hide It Pro
    • CoverMe
    • Secret Photo Vault
    • Secret Calculator
    • Calculator Photo Vault
    • Talk to you children about digital dangers
    • Charge your children’s phones in your room at night

Tips for behavior checks:
Remember to use your nose, look them in the eye, and monitor their behavior.

  • Shifts in mood, motivation, and/or personality
  • Change in relationships with close friends and/or family
  • Avoid eye contact
  • Locked doors
  • Secret phone use
  • Excessive gum, mints, or chandies
  • Energy swings (very active followed by long rest periods)
  • Leaves or disappears for random reasons
  • Overuse of eye drops
  • Poor hygiene or appearance: smoke, cleanliness, track marks, messy hair
  • Weight fluctuation 
  • More frequent sickness

Other resources: Hidden in Plain Sight, How to Spot the Signs, How to Search a Room, Signs of Teen Drug Use

Are you or someone you love impacted by addiction?  Do you need support?

Please Contact Us:
Info@EBIntervention.org 
https://ebintervention.org/
(615) 482-1831

 

Effective Leadership

Effective Leadership

Effective Leadership: It is as Ez as 1-2-3…
Written By: Amy Rhyne

What makes a leader effective?

The title “leader” does not automatically make one effective. However, we have all witnessed how this mindset has led to a negative impact on many systems within educational institutions everywhere. Effective leaders lead from the heart, with a willingness to serve and continuously learn alongside those they are responsible for supporting, coaching and evaluating. Creating a system where there is an individual “Marge in Charge” for the sole purpose of evaluating those within the system will undermine the leader’s efforts and result in negative outcomes.

Fortunately, becoming an effective leader is as Ez as 1-2-3! 

  1. Examine the Environment

You cannot lead people you do not know or are not willing to get to know. As a leader, it is essential that you take time at least annually (more frequently if possible) to ask what is working and not working from those on the front lines completing the daily work, as well as those supporting your system. Furthermore, it is essential to involve a variety of stakeholder voices: administrators, teachers, staff, students, parents and even community members. Once the feedback has been collected, take time to begin making process improvements based on the overall vision, mission and priorities of the group. Creating a positive culture begins with getting to know the priorities of your stakeholders, with the intention of creating an environment where everyone feels welcome and safe. Be mindful… most people see through a phony!  Collecting the information for the sake of creating a positive self-image, rather than process improvement, is dangerous and will backfire every time.

  1. Exemplify Energy and Excitement

One thing to note about the title “leader” is the root word “lead” definitely holds true in most settings. Energy and apathy are both contagious! If a leader is full of energy and excitement, most others follow. Similarly, if a leader makes excuses, is not fully engaged or committed, he/she will find the same character seeping out of those within the system. Effective leaders must observe stakeholders and recognize that, in most cases, it is your daily mirror. “Attitude reflects leadership”. Take time to reflect and adjust based on what you see in the mirror. There will be times the image you see is ugly. We all have ugly moments. What matters most is how we respond when we recognize we are part of the problem. Learn from it, admit when you own it and improve it. Never quit during the tough times, because it is never going to be easy. Rewarding, yes. Easy, no.

  1. Establish Buy In – Engage and Encourage Everyone at Every Level

One key thing to realize is that leaders exist at every level, far beyond the Superintendent and Principal. Teachers are leaders of their classroom system. Students are leaders of their learning. Each level should treat those they lead accordingly. Take the time to meet people where they are, celebrating their strengths and coaching their gaps to afford them the opportunity to become great.  Simply put, an effective leader grows leaders! It is not about what leaders do to, or for, those in the system that matters most. Instead, it is what they do alongside or with them, supporting the individual growth. A leader’s main purpose should be to encourage and celebrate the successes and accomplishments of those they are supporting, coaching and evaluating every step of the way! Take time for a genuine heartfelt thank you for individuals and stakeholders.

A servant leader is the one responsible for holding the spotlight, not the one in front of it. 

As a leader, my goal has always been to leave a place better than I might have entered it and know in my heart that those I have had the honor to support and coach no longer need me. It was my job to hold the spotlight, rather than stand out in front of it. Even during these very trying times, whether in person, virtual or hybrid, I have learned these same values hold true for effective leaders across our state and beyond.

Stick together! Be a present guide, so that no one feels alone in this uncharted territory.  And don’t forget to check your mirror!

7 Essential Components of a Math Curriculum

7 Essential Components of a Math Curriculum

7 Essential Components of Math Instruction: If you had extra money as a school to invest in teaching math, what would you buy?
Written By: Allison Kiser

A friend and colleague of mine recently asked me a great question: If you had extra money as a school to invest in teaching math, what would you buy? 

Her question forced me to think and reflect about math curriculum and instruction.  What would I buy that would help teachers teach math?  What would give the biggest bang for the buck?

My friend asked for my thoughts about a specific program that a teacher at her school wanted to invest in.  When I investigated the program, I realized that the program used gimmicks and memorization as a key strategy to teach children how to solve computation problems.  It is not an effective way to spend valuable time with students. So I first started thinking about math programs because the teachers at her school were looking into programs. 

When I look for a math program for any grade level, I want to see the following components. Unfortunately, I have not yet come across any program that encompasses everything that I want! 

1) Number Routines/Number Talks- Students develop computation and reasoning skills by generating and discussing their strategies with each other. This brief instructional routine should be implemented everyday to see the greatest gain in number sense. 

2) Word Problems- When the math is put in context, students are able to see the connections between the math skills and develop problem solving and reasoning skills. We need to help students make sense of problems and persevere in solving them (yes, the 1st of the 7 mathematical practices!). I want my students to read a problem and ask themselves questions like: What is the question? What do I need to solve the problem? Does this make sense?  I want them to be able to tackle a problem, look for entry points to the solution, and not be intimidated by the structure of the problem.  So, we need to give students a lot of supported and independent word problem practice. 

3) Inquiry-based Tasks- I love to use a number string or word problem as a jumping off point for students to investigate patterns, develop rules, prove theories, and add to their math strategy boards and math tool boards.  I like my students to feel and play with the math, so I use a lot of different math manipulatives, such as unifix cubes, base ten blocks, cards, dice, write on number lines, fraction tiles, measuring devices, balances, rekenreks, counters,  money, magnetic ten frames, 2d shape tiles, and cuisenaire rods. It is so important that students are constantly making connections between concrete, representational, and abstract math.  My best math lessons are when students are working with concrete manipulatives, representational drawings or number lines, and abstract symbols throughout the entire lesson and making connections between these components to understand the math concepts.  (FREE Math Strategy and Math Tool JamBoard)

4) Skill-Specific Math Games- Math games are key! Students can learn and practice the specific concept in an engaging way.  If the game is at their level and is fun, the students won’t even realize they are learning! You can do a lot with cards and dice (it doesn’t have to be a complicated game)! After every game my students play, I have them reflect & connect on the strategies and tools used to play the game, so that I can help make the learning visible to them. 

5) Spiral Review- Students need continuous practice of learned concepts. As they gain new learning and understanding throughout the year, students will make connections with old learning. I also want to make sure my students retain their knowledge to build on new concepts. This may look like 5 questions each day of math concepts they have already learned, either as a warm-up, a center, or homework. 

6) Math projects- Math projects are fun and put math in context. It’s important for students to apply their knowledge, reasoning, and make connections between interwoven math concepts. Projects can also help students see the answer to the question, “when will we use this in real life?”

7) Formative Assessments- I need data! I make a lot of observational notes about my students’ thinking during my math lessons, but I also use exit cards and end of unit quizzes. I need to know where the students are in their continuum of understanding of the math concepts at all times. The exit card can simply be 1 question where the student must solve the problem and justify their thinking.

After thinking about these key components of a math program, I returned to my friend’s question: If you had extra money as a school to invest in teaching math, what would you buy? 

I thought about another friend and colleague of mine, Janna Sells, who says “invest in people over programs.”  The most important component of math curriculum and instruction is the teacher! So by the end of the conversation, my friend and I were discussing giving the teachers collaborative time to dig into these 7 components and discuss and determine how they fit into their math classrooms.  We discussed giving specific math training to teachers on implementing one of these components that they felt they needed more information for better implementation.  Let’s invest in our teachers and not just quickly buy a math program.

So if you have extra money as a school to invest in teaching math this year, what will you buy? 

Do you need support in implementing strong math PLCs in your school?  Call us or send us a message.  We’ll equip you with the tools you need to have strong math teachers without spending a fortune on subpar math curriculums.

Classroom WalkThrough Tools | Does your Leadership Team do their Job?

Classroom WalkThrough Tools | Does your Leadership Team do their Job?

Know thy Impact | Using a Classroom Walkthrough Tool as formative assessment to determine the effectiveness of your Leadership Team
Written By: Shannan Church

To reach total school improvement you want all arrows moving in the same direction. As instructional leaders in the building, it is our responsibility to set our building up for success.  How do we do that?  How do we intentionally and strategically align school improvement?  After we get them aligned, how do we explicitly communicate the alignment with our staff?

School improvement starts and ends with data.  We begin by analyzing universal screening data to write Tier 1 Core Improvement Plans. Then we use those plans to draft our school improvement plans.  These school improvement plans should outline the PD needed in order for the teachers to carry them out to fidelity.  We provide PD teachers need then we use our classroom walkthrough tool (CWT) to formatively assess and provide growth feedback that helps us determine the effectiveness of our Leadership Team’s support.  Check out this easy to read graphic that summarizes these alignments.

Questions Playmaker Leaders ask:

Are the Professional Development trainings provided making impact?  Do our PLCs produce highly effective teachers using high yield strategies in their classroom that in turn positively impact our data and student achievement/growth? 

Easy as 1 – 2 – 3 | Steps Strong Leaders Model

  1. Deep Data Analysis | Use this data to drive tier 1 core improvement plans.
  2. SIP Alignment | Use Tier 1 Plans to write SIP goals (look for trends).  Determine PD needed to carry out your plans.
  3. Plan to Action | Provide the PD that is needed over an appropriate period.  Use a CWT to measure what your teachers are implementing and where they still need support.

Indicator Categories to Consider:

These are several indicators that we know yield high growth.  Please note- only indicators that teachers have received PD on should be on your CWT.  This list is not exhaustive.

  • Learning targets, posted, and communicated (Do students know their goals and success criteria?)
  • Instruction is aligned with standards (Did the PLC collaboratively unpack their content?)
  • Data Representation (Grade, Class, Individual Data Notebooks)
  • Differentiated Instruction (Scaffolded, Flex Groups, Data Driven, Collaborative Groups)
  • Instructional Routines (Literacy and Math)
  • Active Student Engagement (Active or Passive learning)

What does a CWT look like, sound like, feel like?

Now that you understand the critical components and compelling why of CWTs you may be asking how do I actually complete these?  Here are some rules our team lives by.

  1. Walk with a purpose.  Are you observing instruction or behavior?  Figure out who is completing the CWTs.  If you are completing behavior walks, this should be completed/done by the administration and counselors in your school.  If you are completing instructional walks, this should be completed/done by the administration and coaches in your building.
  2. Inter-rater reliability matters. At the beginning of each you review your indicators as a leadership team.  Discuss quality measures and non-examples.  It’s a great idea to complete paired walks the first couple weeks.  This will create unbiased, equitable marks and feedback throughout the building.
  3. Frequency over duration.  Each member of your leadership team should complete a minimum of 5 walks per week.  These are quick shots.  Create a schedule for who is walking where each week.  Only stay in the classroom 3-5 minutes per walk.
  4. Feedback feeds back.  Teachers crave positive feedback and constructive feedback.  Create a system for yourself.  Every time you complete a walk pick out something positive and then grow your teacher with a “have you thought about” idea.  Check out the tear off notepads we use to leave our teachers love notes when we walk into their classrooms.
  5. PLCs are the lifeblood.  Leadership Teams should make a standing agenda item to discuss/review the classroom walk data during their weekly leadership PLC and collaboratively design PLC agendas that support and grow teachers based on CWT data.

Do you need help aligning school improvement at your school?  We are here to help – send us your needs info@i-leadr.com.

Do you need help designing your own classroom walkthrough tool on a limited budget?  We’ll help you make one for free that will collect your data and represent it in easy to use charts for your leadership PLCs and teacher PLCs.  Reach out to us at info@i-leadr.com.

Virtual Learning Playbook

Virtual Learning Playbook

Your Classroom is Your Classroom
Written By: Brie Beane

The 5 Big Plays to Maximize Success in a Virtual, Remote or Hybrid Model

Your classroom is your classroom! 

It is our responsibility as educators to reach and teach ALL children we serve, but how do we effectively do that now that we are serving in a virtual, remote and/or hybrid model? 

This is the #1 question we have received from educators all over the country. District administrators, building administrators, support specialists, instructional coaches, counselors, and teachers are worried, fearful, frustrated and discouraged on a daily basis.  The struggle is REAL ya’ll, but there is an answer.  Follow these 5 Big Plays in order to Maximize Success regardless of how you are required to deliver instruction.

The 5 Big Plays

Play 1 | The Pre-Game

Social Emotional Well-Being

“You can’t pour from an empty cup.  You have to look after yourself in order to have something to offer others” – Tarynne West.  Educators all over the county are worried about the social emotional well-being of the students who are not showing up to the schoolhouse, not attending virtual sessions, not submitting work, and not relying to communication attempts from the school or the teacher(s), but in order to give the best of us to our students, we must first reach our best self. Identifying your stressors, establishing consistent routines, developing a self-care plan and staying accountable to that plan will set you up for success. 

Play 2 | The Rulebook

Building Processes, Procedures, Routines and Relationships

Identifying and teaching your expectations for virtual instruction; identify, communicate and teach your procedural routines; and establishing and building positive and lasting relationships are essential in order to maximize success. 

“They may forget what you said, but they will never forget how you made them feel” – Carl W. Buechner.  Teacher-student relationships are one of the most important factors in determining overall positive outcomes for students.  John Hattie’s research indicates that building positive teacher-student relationships yields over one year of growth impact on a child prior to even delivering instruction.  I cannot stress this play enough, Relationships Matter!!  Rita Pearson said it best when she said, “Children don’t learn from people they don’t like.”

 Play 3 | The Huddle

Virtual Professional Learning Community

“Professional learning communities are the lifeblood of school improvement” – Janna Sells. PLCs should never take a back seat to our necessary daily routines as an educational organization.  Whether you meet face-to-face or in a virtual professional learning community, you should maintain a consistent meeting agenda, engage in regularly scheduled rotations, and collaboratively plan and align virtual instruction with your colleagues to ensure equitable delivery of instruction.

Play 4 | Game Time

Virtual Engagement

Best practice doesn’t change because your classroom design changed.  We do not have to go out and learn how to teach in a completely different way, but instead take what we know how to do and tweak it to successfully deliver that same best practice in a virtual, remote, or hybrid setting.  Imagine you are switching cars for a short time.  It still gets you where you’re going, it just looks and feels different.  Maintaining familiar practices – such as taking attendance, student discourse, and eliciting student response are essential best practice strategies that should be continued.  Consistently embedding active participation strategies, to include verbal, written and action responses into your instructional delivery will keep students engaged and participating.  “The people doing the talking, are the people doing the learning” – Dr. Anita Archer.

Play 5 | Post Game Analysis

Feedback, Assessments and Grading

How do you ensure that your students are learning what you are teaching them?  Data!  The data we collect tells us most of what we need to know.  Assessments should be used to measure the learning of our students, not simply for obtaining grades.  In addition to assessments, virtual conferences, written or oral feedback on student work, and virtual student data notebooks are vital components to ensure we are continuously relying on our data to drive our decision making on a daily basis.

Our students need us more than we may ever know.  We are their structure, their security, their teachers.  Following the 5 Big Plays above will help you to Maximize Success in a Virtual Setting.

Check out our Virtual Learning Playbook for downloadable access to templates and a step-by-step guide to these Big Plays.

 

It’s Not an Issue Until It’s Your Child

It’s Not an Issue Until It’s Your Child

My Secret Life

A True Story to Engage and Supervise Your Child or Student
Written By: Adam Simon – EB Intervention Team

Addiction was not a very important conversation in my family until it was about me. No one would have ever believed that I would end up looking at a seven year prison sentence at 22 years old from where I came from.  I had a wonderful life.

I often hear that addicts have something really wrong in their lives or something missing that causes a life of ruin to take place.  We hear many uninformed well meaning people share that the breakdown of the family unit, godlessness, or childhood trauma is to blame for the plight of the addict.  They could not have helped it, we often hear.  I share my story to poke holes in those narratives of addiction.  I have not seen an entity in our society that is more egalitarian than addiction.  It is no respecter of race, color, language, gender or socio economic background.  It will consume and destroy the lives of those it afflicts.  It is a rapacious creditor to all those who are involved with the one afflicted. 

My parents are some of the most incredible Christians I have ever met. They have been engaged in a loving marriage for over 42 years.   Many of our family friends have a sort of jesting jealousy towards the love affair and relationship they have.  They raised  us in a faithful home where love and forgiveness were the keystones of my childhood.  Our parents read us the bible and prayed with us daily.  We were a family that ate meals together at a round wooden table with our assigned seats every dinner throughout my childhood.  My sister and I were loved fully and often overfed, as I like to say.  We won the ovarian lottery.  My family was often referred to as The Cleavers.  We were raised in a small one red light town in Tennessee, where my family was well known and of the top 2% of wealth in our area.  We seemingly had a life that would create a safeguard from the darkness of the world. Not you, right? 

I was 12 years old the first time I grabbed my first bottle of alcohol and started my journey towards drug addiction and alcoholism.  Within six months of my first drink I had gotten drunk alone and begun to smoke weed, inhale synthetic and designer drugs, and found pharmaceutical means of self medicating.  At 16 it was cocaine and by 18 I had found methamphetamine.  I was arrested the first time in a 3rd world country when I was 17  and had participated in a myriad of local, state, federal and international felonious acts as a result of my drug addiction.  During this period, I still excelled in academics, athletics and frequented church and church events.  I was able to recover quickly and utilize very small amounts of time and money to engage and to grow my addiction.  I learned quickly how to navigate my life with my addiction.  I always had a preparation pack in my car that included a change of clothes scented hand lotion and eye drops to cover my tracks.  I always showed up to church events and birthday parties and family events late and left early to create my alibi with my timeline for each day. I always asked for more money each week for lunch and gas and used 20% of it so I could have the majority to buy what I needed. I began to steal food and cheat people in deals at a very young age so that I could stretch allowance each week further. I was constantly in a state of preparation and calculation to contribute to my habit.  It quickly turned to education and manipulation of street life and building deliberate and organized networks to create opportunities to increase my activity and engagement with my addiction.  A typical Tuesday would include me leaving a white upper middle class home and neighborhood and going to a private college preparatory school and going to soccer practice and getting something to eat with friends and coming back home, is what was seen.  The reality of that Tuesday was quite different.  It really went like this.  On the way to school I would take a low milligram of benzodiazepine (xanax), I would get to school and then have an open period and open campus lunch. I would ask mom for 40 dollars for lunch and gas.  I would go get something to go from the lunch cafeteria and charge it to my account. I would go out for lunch, split a 6 pack of beer or go and smoke a joint. 

I would come back from lunch. I would then not have soccer practice start until 3:30, and school would end at 2:45.  I would leave school and drive to one of my friends’ house before parents got home from work and smoke another joint.  I would then return to school and go to soccer practice.  I would then end practice at 5:00, and tell my parents it ended at 5:30.  

I would then take that time to go and do some work for the streets.  I would call a couple guys and see what they wanted from the upper class society. I would then take an order, call my contacts and make transfers.  I would get the drugs at one price and sell at a high price and would earn bonuses for the product as I did more work.  I was a mule at first but grew in the enterprise and that was when I was 16 to 18 years old.   

Addiction is often not a relevant issue in many communities until it’s your child or someone you love.  It often only takes a certain family to highlight the nature of addiction. It’s important to understand that in many communities kids like me will start their journey this year.  However, there is hope in this process.  We can and we do recover from a seemingly hopeless state of mind and body. Our engagement and supervision in our kids lives are of the utmost value.  

3 Simple Steps to Engage and Supervise Your Child or Student

  1. There are many different applications and services available.  A few top rated apps are called Bark, Qustudio, and WebWatcher.  Your kids will revolt at the mention of this application, however it is vital for you to understand about their life online.  It will give you a more accurate picture of where they are. 
  2. Take a look at all of their friends and the places they frequent.  A real strict assessment of the places and people in your kids life is paramount.  You need to know the influences in their lives.  It’s very important to not dismiss family.  Family often lends itself to the most access available for your kids. 
  3. Schedule regular time to be with each of your kids.  This time should not be family time.  Spend time individually with each one of your kids on a regular basis.  Time with each child creates a different level of closeness as they grow up.  So often I counsel kids to reach out and sit down with their parents and share openly and honestly, and they don’t know how to do that.  It must become a necessity in your lives.  I would strongly encourage you to do this without any technology.  It will force that time to be more meaningful.  Sit down, ask your child how they are doing and then just listen.  We so often as parents assume the authoritarian and teaching role, we forget to hear them. 

To read and learn more from the EB Intervention Team, click here.

Do you or someone else you love suffer from drug or alcohol addiction?  Do you need support?  

Please Contact Us: 
Info@EBInterventrion.org
https://ebintervention.org/
(615) 482-1831